• Siri DeMarche

How To Combat Chronic Inflammation, Improve Your Health, & Eliminate Unwanted Fat Cells

Updated: Aug 2

Conventional wisdom dictates that, "no matter how much you exercise, or how clean your diet is, you'll always be stuck with the same number of fat cells." This means that if you've ever had excess weight on your body, those fat cells from that excess weight will never disappear. Rather they will just shrink when you've lost the weight... until you eat an extra few helpings of chocolate salted caramel blondies, and then get big again. But luckily for us, and those extra (few...several..whole batch...) helpings of salted caramel blondie bars, this outdated dogma is just a myth that needs to be busted.


The variable that you must eliminate in order to drastically improve overall health, prevent disease, and kill off those fat cells is chronic inflammation. Unless you get rid of it, your fat cells will "keep on keeping on" and your health will suffer. Chronic inflammation is a predominant factor in most people's lives (hence the dogma of being stuck with your fat cells permanently). There are several lifestyle factors that lead to an abundance of inflammation. Perhaps the most common among them are poor sleep patterns, poor dietary choices, and a hectic lifestyle. When your body is bombarded with these factors on a regular basis and over-loaded with ultra-processed carbohydrates and vegetable oils, it over-produces chemicals that can cause serious long-term damage and lead to a continuous up-hill battle to lose weight.

These chemicals include, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), which affect your body via the dysregulation of white blood cell migration, insulin resistance, overproduction of nitric oxide, and more. While inflammation can be caused by several different factors (like psychological stress), the primary cause is actually processed vegetable oils (think safflower, peanut, canola, and sunflower oils). Most polyunsaturated oils are super unstable and prone to oxidation, and consuming unstable oils that are subjected to high temperatures and high pressures (i.e. cooked, fried, or treated) is a surefire way to develop inflammation and insulin resistance. Oxidation increases the production of highly toxic substances in your arteries, leading to insulin resistance, leptin resistance, and rampant inflammation throughout your body. FYI most oils found in the grocery store and in the food you eat at restaurants are polyunsaturated, so it's imperative that you choose better options when you can- think cold-pressed & unrefined coconut oil, avocado oil, grass-fed butter, and extra virgin olive oil (save olive oil for dressings instead of cooking, as it has a lower smoke point).

Eliminating (or at least drastically decreasing) your consumption of unstable polyunsaturated fats is critical to decreasing chronic inflammation and also eradicating the fat cells.


Secondary to removing toxic polyunsaturated fats from your diet is understanding glycemic variability (GV) to induce fat cells to die and improve overall health & longevity. GV includes the oscillating amounts of blood sugar circulating at any given time & your blood sugar fluctuations that occur at the same time on different days.If your blood sugar gets too high & GV goes haywire, your body will either 1) get rid of the blood sugar by shuttling it into muscle tissue or 2) store it as body fat (happens when your energy expenditure during the day isn't high enough to convert blood sugar into energy in your muscles). Every type of sugar that you consume ends up as glucose in your blood (from milk, honey, fruit, a chocolate bar...)This is NOT the problem. The problem is when your blood sugar levels bounce all over the place from consuming too many calories from non-nutrient-dense-sugar sources (consuming sugar too often, consuming processed carbohydrates, & eating too often regardless of the source).


Other important factors that have a negative affect on glycemic variability, that increase the likelihood of fat cell retention, and that decrease overall health status are sleep deprivation, eating too often (stop eating six times a day), allergies & food intolerances (cause a systemic inflammatory response and disrupt insulin function), micronutrient deficiencies (dysregulation of insulin and changes in glucose and amino acid metabolism), thyroid health, toxins and chemicals (your body produces new fat cells to store chemicals like BPA, DDT, and DDE to protect other tissues and internal organs), hormone imbalances (due to lack of sleep, external & internal stress, exposure to pesticides, poor digestive health, & dietary contaminants), avoidance of cold exposure (brown adipose tissue needs cold exposure to signal to your body to start burning white adipose tissue via non-shivering thermogenesis), strict adherence to the SAID principle (Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demands aka your body adapts to the demands placed on it. Eventually you will become very efficient at a particular exercise, that your body will burn less calories to perform it- so it's important to mix things up every 8-12 weeks), unbalanced extreme chronic cardio (leads your body to store fat as an energy source and also to get rid of unnecessary weight, i.e. muscle. When training for endurance events, it's critical that you have a smart & balanced training plan and a smart diet- so that you can actually use the energy that your body is storing as fat), and too much exercise (leads to inflammation, elevated cortisol levels, and hormonal dysregulation).


Steps to combat all the above:

  • Strength Training

  • Fasted light exercise

  • 10-30min walk after eating

  • Standing (but don't stay in one position all day)

  • Consume blood sugar-stabilizing plants, herbs, and spices (Ceylon cinnamon, berberine, apple cider vinegar, Panax notoginseng, astragalus membranaceus, wild bitter melon)

  • Consume fiber (breaks down into short-chain fatty acids that inhibit the conversion of glucose into fatty acids and increase insulin sensitivity).

  • Cold thermogenesis (adiponectin is a hormone released during cold exposure that breaks down fat and shuttles glucose into your muscles, helping to lower blood sugar)

There you have it! Short, sweet, BUT VERY IMPORTANT :)


TLDR

Conventional wisdom dictates that if you've ever had excess weight on your body, those fat cells never disappear, they will only shrink. This is not true. Chronic inflammation and glycemic variability are the two most significant contributors to fat cell retention and overall poor health status, so it's important to get them under control. Some steps to take are:

  • Strength Training

  • Fasted light exercise

  • 10-30min walk after eating

  • Standing (but don't stay in one position all day)

  • Consume blood sugar-stabilizing plants, herbs, and spices (Ceylon cinnamon, berberine, apple cider vinegar, Panax notoginseng, astragalus membranaceus, wild bitter melon)

  • Consume fiber (breaks down into short-chain fatty acids that inhibit the conversion of glucose into fatty acids and increase insulin sensitivity).

  • Cold thermogenesis (adiponectin is a hormone released during cold exposure that breaks down fat and shuttles glucose into your muscles, helping to lower blood sugar)

Other easily manipulated lifestyle factors that play a secondary role in unwanted fat cell retention and poor health status are: sleep deprivation, eating too often, allergies & food intolerances, micronutrient deficiencies, thyroid health, toxins and chemicals, hormone imbalances, avoidance of cold exposure, strict adherence to the SAID principle, unbalanced extreme chronic cardio, and too much exercise.


References

Methods to Identify the Lactate and Glucose Thresholds During Resistance Exercise for Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes

Postprandial Lipaemia: Effects of Sitting, Standing, and Walking in Healthy Normolipidaemic Humans

The beneficial role of Vitamin D in obesity: possible genetic and cell signaling mechanisms

Skeletal Muscle Glucose Uptake During Exercise: How is it Regulated?

Effect of meal frequency on glucose and insulin excursions over the course of a day

Butyrate Improves Insulin Sensitivity and Increases Energy Expenditure in Mice

Cold Exposure Increases Adiponectin Levels in Men

Improvement of Obesity and Glucose Tolerance by Acetate in Type 2 Diabetic Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) Rats

Protection from obesity and diabetes by blockade of TGF-β/Smad3 Signaling

Training in the Fasted State Improves Glucose Tolerance During Fat-Rich Diet

News Alert: You *Don't* Need to Eat Within 60 Minutes After a Workout.

5 Simple Steps You Can Take to Live Longer, Banish Blood Sugar Swings, & Massively Enhance Energy Levels

2 Potent Ways to Kill Fat Cells and Lose Fat Fast

How To Hack Your Workplace For Enhanced Productivity, Less Muscle, Pain, Better Focus & More.

4 Ways To Eat Yourself Beautiful: Meat On The Bone, Fermented & Sprouted Foods, Organ Meats, Deep Nutrition & More With Dr. Cate Shanahan



Statements made on this website have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration or any other medical body. I do not aim to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any illness or disease. Information is shared for educational purposes only. You must consult your doctor before acting on any content on this website, especially if you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a medical condition.


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